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Glass Cherries
and Cherry Jewelry

Glass Cherries


Bing Cherry Earrings on Silver French Wires
Bing Cherry Earrings
Sterling Silver
EBHB-CVS
Single Bing Cherry Necklace on Sterling Silver
Single Bing Cherry Necklace
Sterling Silver
NBHB-CTS
Rainier Cherry Earrings on Gold French Wires
Rainier Cherry Earrings
14/20 Gold-Filled
EBHR-CVG
Single Rainier Cherry Necklace on 14/20 Gold-Filled
Single Rainier Cherry Necklace
14/20 Gold-Filled
NBHR-CTG
Ripening Glass Bing Cherry Bracelet on Gold-Filled
Ripening Bing Cherry Bracelet
Gold-Filled
RBHB-ELG
Ripening Glass Rainier Cherry Bracelet on Gold-Filled
Ripening Rainier Cherry Bracelet
14/20 Gold-Filled
RBHR-ELG
Rainier Cherry Earrings on Sterling Silver V-Wires
Rainier Cherry Earrings
Sterling Silver
EBHR-CVS
Single Rainier Cherry Necklace on Sterling Silver
Single Rainier Cherry Necklace
Sterling Silver
NBHR-CTS
Small Bing Cherry Beads
Small Bing Cherry
Beads
BBHB-S
Bing Cherry Sculptures
Bing Cherry Sculptures
SBHB
Rainier Cherry Sculptures
Rainier Cherry Sculptures
SBHR-L
Rainier Cherry Beads
Small Rainier Cherry Beads
BBHR-S

I make realistic Bing and Rainier Cherries from glass. Each cherry is individually made by melting Italian soda-lime glass rods in the 4000 degree flame of a torch using gravity, surface tension and a razor-blade tool.

Depending on the amount of sun they have received, ripe Rainier Cherries can range from entirely yellow, through shades of raspberry pink, to a dark reddish-pink in color. The lighter areas are where the cherry has been shaded by the leaves. I am sad to report that these pictures do not show the correct color. The areas on my glass cherries that appear to be from light to dark raspberry pink look much more orange or red in these pictures than in real life. The pink color shown on the Rainier Cherry Earrings and Necklaces is more accurate. The realistic rosy blush on the surface of each of my glass cherries is achieved by adding and melting in up to twenty separate layers of transparent red glass in the flame of a torch. No paint is used. As a result, the color will not rub, flake or chip off.

The color of Bing cherries is more dependent on their ripeness than how much they were exposed to the sun. The variety of coloration on these cherries is achieved by mixing various shades of black and red to get the base color. Then up to five different colors of powdered glass enamel are melted onto the surface to give the "speckled" effect in just the right tones to go with the base cherry color.

Just like real cherries, each of my glass cherries has a slight dent down the side and a little "flower scar" on the bottom.

The cherry stem is made by melting glass onto a loop in 16 gauge copper wire so the wire cannot be pulled out. I cut off the wire at about 2 inches long and then melt the end in the flame to round it over so it will not catch on skin or clothing. If you want to use the cherries in jewelry you can make a loop and twist the stem as shown in the Bead pictures.

You can certainly find less expensive glass cherries on the market, but they are cartoon-style cherries that bear little resemblance to natural ones. Mine are lifelike enough that people often mistake them for real cherries. I hope you will find them to be worth the extra cost.

Click any image for details and a larger view.

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